Emergency Medicine Billing Leader DuvaSawko Celebrates its 20 Year Anniversary

DuvaSawko Staff

Two Decades of innovation and leadership in Emergency Medicine Brings DuvaSawko to this Distinctive Milestone

Time flies when you’re having fun and taking the lead in the Emergency Medicine revenue cycle management industry. The founding partners at DuvaSawko have been cornerstones in the Emergency Medicine industry for over 2 decades, and there’s no stopping them any time soon. January 19, 2018 marks the 20 year anniversary of when Dr. Charles “Chuck” Duva and Dr. William “Bill” Sawko launched their industry powerhouse in Ormond Beach, FL. Back then, the rationale was simple, and it still remains true today: Create a company that delivers the highest level of reimbursement from Billing And Coding with a process designed exclusively for the Emergency Medicine specialty. To say the pair succeeded in spectacular fashion is an understatement!

There was a hole in the industry that the pair identified early on when they were at the helm of their own Emergency Medicine group. “We had outsourced our billing to 3 different companies, each one worse than the other…it got to the point where they almost put us out of business,” said Dr. Chuck Duva, co-founder and CEO of DuvaSawko in a recent interview. They put their heads together and developed the software, process and team necessary to deliver one of the most effective revenue cycle solutions designed exclusively for Emergency Departments.

Dr. Duva went on to say, “Nothing can compare to developing a process that works, and continuously improving on it…it’s the reason our clients love us!” There is something to be said for the exclusivity of only doing billing for a specific industry and the DuvaSawko brand has done that exceptionally well over the past two decades.

“The intricacies of being able to effectively bill for Emergency Medicine is not for the inexperienced or those with ‘general knowledge’ of billing and coding,” said Dr. Bill Sawko, co-founder and CIO of DuvaSawko. Dr. Sawko went on to say “There are an infinite number of ways to incorrectly bill for Emergency Medicine…we have taken our expertise in ED along with my passion for software and information technology and created a final product that is head and shoulders above the competition.”

DuvaSawko has produced a significant number of industry firsts over the past 20 years. Most recently, they have launched their DuvaSawko Revenue Calculator. The Revenue Calculator offers Emergency Medicine practices the ability to immediately identify missing revenue from their practice in three easy steps. Dr. Duva went on to say, “It’s our dedication to excellence and the commitment of our team that has made DuvaSawko an industry leader – we can’t wait to see what the next 20 years brings!”

This press release originally appeared on PR Web: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15106071.htm

DuvaSawko Executives Climb Mt. Kilimanjaro to Support Cancer Research

Our founder, Dr. Sawko, VP and CIO of DuvaSawko, along with DuvaSawko’s Director of Information Technology Tim Branz, and 10 other members of Dr. Sawko’s extended family are taking part in a trek to Africa starting today to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. The climb is to bring awareness to those suffering from cancer and raise money for MeStrong. Please visit the link below to PRWeb to read about the climb, track the group, and see photos as they post them. You can also find a link to make a donation if you’d like to help the cause!

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14416260.htm

‘Secret sauce’ is key to company’s growth, says DuvaSawko CEO

‘Secret sauce’ is key to company’s growth, says DuvaSawko CEO

 

Dr. Charles Duva, seen here in a photo taken last year, is the co-founder and CEO of DuvaSawko, a medical billing company for emergency department physicians that has been steadily growing and is now looking to add a second location to accommodate its expanding workforce. NEWS-JOURNAL FILE/JIM TILLER

Published: Saturday, March 12, 2016 at 7:08 p.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, March 12, 2016 at 7:08 p.m.

ORMOND BEACH — DuvaSawko is an Ormond Beach medical billing company that has been steadily growing since its launch in 1998.

Dr. Charles Duva, DuvaSawko’s co-founder and CEO, is proud of noting the company’s growth continued even during the Great Recession at a 15 percent clip and that its growth has accelerated to 20 percent the past five years.

While that growth has been in revenues, Duva said his company has expanded its workforce accordingly.

After starting with five employees that included Duva and co-founder Dr. William Sawko, the company’s chief information officer, DuvaSawko today employs 240, having added 21 in the past year.

Duva said he expects to add at least 40 more in the coming year and is now searching for an additional office space to lease, just a little over two years after DuvaSawko moved to its present 30,000-square-foot headquarters building at 298 S. Yonge St.

That move, from its previous location at the Cornerstone Office Park at LPGA and Williamson boulevards in Daytona Beach, provided it with an additional 7,000 square feet of space.

Duva recently spoke with The News-Journal. The following are edited excerpts from that interview.

When your company began, where were you and how big was that original space?

We were in South Daytona at Waterside Plaza in a leased office space of 1,250 square feet.

How much space are you now planning to add?

We are looking for another 20,000 square feet. There’s no more room where we are. … We left South Daytona and built both of those (Cornerstone Office Park) buildings on the corner of LPGA and Williamson in 2004. We sold (Cornerstone) in 2007 (and continued as a tenant until November 2013).

What prompted you and Dr. Sawko to start DuvaSawko?

We were practicing medicine in DeLand and Orange City. We had to have a billing company, but the companies available at the time couldn’t meet our service needs so we decided to start our own company.

How have you maintained your growth?

We found what we call the “secret sauce.” We have today the No. 1 billing company in the country that specializes in emergency medicine. We do medical coding and medical billing for physicians who specialize in emergency medicine. When you have a good product it’s easy to stay busy, particularly when you have the best product. We collect more money for our clients than any other emergency physician medical billing company.

Can you divulge your secret sauce?

Would Kentucky Fried Chicken do that? No! Our secret sauce is do everything right. It’s that simple.

Do you expect to continue growing at your present rate?

We plan on at least doubling and possibly tripling the company in the next five years.

Was it in part because the need for healthcare services doesn’t go away, even during an economic downturn?

Yes, that doesn’t go away. But also when there’s a recession and business is down, people are looking for a company that can help them improve cash flow, and that’s what we do.

How spread out are your clients?

We’re in 11 states, 70 hospitals, all the way out west to Arizona and all the way north to Wisconsin.

Any tips for success to share?

Not really. I just hope that Volusia County can attract real business, other companies like ours — the same culture and premier products. That’s why I’m involved in Team Volusia (Economic Development Corp., the public/private partnership group dedicated to efforts to recruit businesses to the county). I sit on the executive board. I give them $25,000 a year to be on that board on top of giving all your time free because I’m interested in attracting the right companies here that can create good jobs. I’m not the only one. We all want to see the county grow. … I think we’re making some headway now, but we have a long way to go.

 

Source: http://www.news-journalonline.com/article/20160312/NEWS/160319818

SURVEY: Nearly 1 in 4 Volusia-Flagler employers plans to add jobs

SURVEY: Nearly 1 in 4 Volusia-Flagler employers plans to add jobs

Published: Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 3:37 p.m.

DAYTONA BEACH — Nearly one out of four employers — 24 percent — in the Volusia-Flagler area expect to add workers this spring, according to a new survey.

Conversely, only 2 percent expect to lay off workers in the April through June period, according to the latest quarterly survey by national staffing agency Manpower Inc.

That 22 percent “net employment” forecast for “Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach” is tied with seven other metro areas for 26th highest in the nation, according to the report.

In Florida, only Lakeland and Miami had higher net employment forecasts for the second quarter — 23 percent, two of 13 metro areas tied for 13th highest in the country.

While the net employment forecast for the “Deltona” area, which covers Volusia and Flagler counties, is down from 26 percent in Manpower’s forecast a year ago, the percentage of employers expecting to maintain staff levels rose to 72 percent, up from 65 percent a year ago.

“I am encouraged,” said Lisa Hancock, Manpower’s Central Florida market vice president, of the increased stability in employment levels.

The unemployment rates in both Volusia and Flagler counties have steadily declined in recent years, according to the most recent Florida Department of Economic Opportunity data. Volusia’s jobless rate improved to 5 percent in December, while Flagler ended the year at 5.5 percent. During the recession, Volusia’s unemployment rate soared to 12.8 percent, while Flagler’s rate peaked at 15.2 percent, highest in the state.

Hancock, who lives in DeBary, said Manpower’s Volusia-Flagler office in Holly Hill has seen more businesses seeking to fill service positions. Demand is also up for skilled trades workers, such as machinists, welders and carpenters.

Many of the workers Manpower farms out are on a potential temp-to-permanent hire basis, Hancock said. “They (employers) like the try ’em before you buy ’em model,” she said. “Hiring would be greater if there were more skilled workers. If we had 10 more, we’d place them today.”

Hancock said she did not know how many Volusia-Flagler employers were surveyed, but believed the number was around 100.

“We’ve had some false starts” in terms of employers in past surveys saying they intended to add jobs, but not actually doing so, Hancock acknowledged, however, the Volusia-Flagler hiring forecasts the past three quarters have proven fairly accurate, she said.

One employer adding jobs is DuvaSawko, an Ormond Beach provider of medical billing and coding services for emergency department physicians.

DuvaSawko, which employs 240 workers, added 21 in the past year and expects to hire 42 more in coming months, said spokeswoman Joanne Manser. DuvaSawko is not a Manpower client.

DuvaSawko is one of several employers set to take part in the Spring Career Fair at Daytona State College’s Daytona Beach campus Wednesday as well as The News-Journal’s Mega Job Fair March 15 at the News-Journal Center performing arts complex in downtown Daytona Beach, she said.

Dr Duva – In the News

FITNESS & WELL-BEING SPOTLIGHT

Taking care of business much like tending to patients, doctor says

Published: Thursday, December 24, 2015 at 2:30 p.m.

 

Dr. Charles Duva poses with an employee group photo at his office at DuvaSawko in Ormond Beach. Duva, a doctor by profession, retired his practice after a motorcycle accident in 1995. He started DuvaSawko, a medical billing company, in 1998. NEWS-JOURNAL/Jim Haug

Before he started a medical billing company, DuvaSawko, Dr. Charles Duva practiced both emergency and family medicine. He was part of a physicians group that once owned Bert Fish Memorial Hospital when it was in DeLand in the 1980s. Duva spoke to The News-Journal about his experiences.

Why did your group of physicians purchase the hospital?

Financially, it was not doing well.  At the time, I just went into private practice in DeLand as a family practitioner after practicing emergency medicine.

Within two months, this idea surfaced of buying Bert Fish. There was nine us, eight primary care physicians and a specialist in urology. We purchased it from the Bert Fish trust in 1983. We owned it for four years and made it financially stable.

Who was Bert Fish?

An attorney who lived in DeLand who had (a lot of real estate). He became an ambassador to Egypt (under President Franklin D. Roosevelt.) Medicine was his philanthropy. He built the hospital in New Smyrna Beach, too. He was a giver.

What changes did you make to the hospital that were new to the area?

We started the breast clinic with a mammography machine. We also brought in a plastic surgeon from Ormond Beach to do some post-mastectomy construction.

Why did you sell the hospital?

We were going to move it to where it is now in Orange City, but we needed a majority vote of our board and did not have (the votes).

Then we decided to put it up for sale. A number of hospital companies wanted to buy it.

The governor (Rick Scott) was working for (one of the hospital corporations) at the time. We had dinner together and spoke about it once. His offer was turned down.

We would have done very well (financially), but all of the (potential purchasers) were going to bring in physicians to staff the hospital. It would have been strong competition for the physicians in the community.

So we decided to take the high road and donated it to the local hospital authority.

Why did you stop practicing medicine?

On July 1, 1995, I got hit head-on on State Road A1A when I was on my motorcycle. That was the last day I practiced medicine. That was 20 years ago this past July.

For a year, I did not do anything. I rehabilitated myself.

I had a head injury, a broken hip. There were multiple fractures in my left foot and left lower leg, and rib fractures too.

Professionally, I went back to managing a physicians’ group.

I worked on a certificate in medical management from Tulane University and became the medical director for the Adventist (system) for five years on top of doing my leadership piece with an emergency medicine group (of physicians).

In 1998, we started this company (DuvaSawko) to do coding and billing services (for emergency medicine), primarily because others were not doing a very good job. Others asked us to do (billing) for them, too.

How is is business?

Today we bill over a billion dollars a year. We have clients in 11 states right now. We have 235 employees.

We have 30,000 square feet (of office space). By 2017, we’ll probably need another 20,000 square feet.

We have been very successful. We have never lost a client since we have been in business for 17 years. Not many people can say that about anything.

Do you miss practicing medicine?

I do, that’s what I was trained to do. It’s where my heart has been all my life. I love patient interaction. I love talking to people and helping them, but those are good attributes for business, too.

When you’re working with a client, they see you are interested in helping them and doing things right. At the same time, you have to have a clear mind with respect to business operations. You have to understand what you have to do and what you can’t do.

I run into a lot of doctors who say, “Gosh, I want to do what you do.”

I say, “it’s not as easy as you think it is.”

The grass is not always greener?

Exactly. There is still a lot of pressure and stress in this job because we have clients. We try to give them the best service we can, and with that comes stress and anxiety.

Fitness & Well-being Spotlight is a weekly feature profiling area residents who have made healthy habits a priority in their lives, or those dedicated to helping others make healthy lifestyle changes. If you would like to nominate someone for a profile, email jim.haug@news-jrnl.com.